DPVis: Visual Analytics with Hidden Markov Models for Disease Progression Pathways

Bum Chul Kwon, Vibha Anand, Kristen A Severson, Soumya Ghosh, Zhaonan Sun, Brigitte I Frohnert, Markus Lundgren, Kenney Ng

View presentation: 2020-10-30T15:00:00Z GMT-0600 Change your timezone on the schedule page
2020-10-30T15:00:00Z
Exemplar figure
DPVis allows users to investigate heterogenous disease progression pathways by interactively exploring the outputs of Hidden Markov Models. DPVis seamlessly integrates HMMs and provides views and interactive features that facilitate users to formulate and test hypotheses by iteratively constructing multiple subgroups based on state transitions and distributions over multiple measures and then analyzing and comparing them.
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Direct link to video on YouTube: https://youtu.be/zfdxdKJvM8E

Keywords

Visual Analytics, Design Study, Disease Progression, Hidden Markov Model, State Space Model, Diabetes, Huntingtons, Parkinsons, Interpretability

Abstract

Clinical researchers use disease progression models to understand patient status and characterize progression patterns from longitudinal health records. One approach for disease progression modeling is to describe patient status using a small number of states that represent distinctive distributions over a set of observed measures. Hidden Markov models (HMMs) and its variants are a class of models that both discover these states and make inferences of health states for patients. Despite the advantages of using the algorithms for discovering interesting patterns, it still remains challenging for medical experts to interpret model outputs, understand complex modeling parameters, and clinically make sense of the patterns. To tackle these problems, we conducted a design study with clinical scientists, statisticians, and visualization experts, with the goal to investigate disease progression pathways of chronic diseases, namely type 1 diabetes (T1D), Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). As a result, we introduce DPVis which seamlessly integrates model parameters and outcomes of HMMs into interpretable and interactive visualizations. In this study, we demonstrate that DPVis is successful in evaluating disease progression models, visually summarizing disease states, interactively exploring disease progression patterns, and building, analyzing, and comparing clinically relevant patient subgroups.